Digital Asia – Growing trends with Censorship

Byron's Babbles

‌The growing expansion of Digital Asia over the past decade has allowed for a greater exchange of information and media between people. The development of new platforms provides new ways of connection, with financial, social and political transactions all now possible via digital platforms, ultimately removing the barriers. This is especially apparent in the current environment with the existence of COVID19. The evolution of Digital Asia has allowed increased ability for information to be shared between Asia and the rest of the world, with global flows of information, culture, media and more coming in and out of the region. CNBC (2020) has shown an increase of “40 million new internet users” in SouthEast Asia.

I have been able to learn about key aspects of Digital Asia through the increasing distribution of Asia media. From documentaries such as the self financed and highly controversial documentary ‘Under the Dome’ which was created…

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One comment

  1. Definitely an extremely topical issue, thinking about this (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-08-31/chinese-actor-censored-taken-off-internet-zhao-wei-ccp/100420164) story that came out of China at the end of August surrounding Chinese actress Zhao Wei. Wei who had a billion-dollar net worth and a large fan following has been “cleaned” from the Chinese internet. The extent of this erasure consists of the removal of all serials and chat shows featuring her from major Chinese online streaming sites and the removal of her name from the online credits for the movies she appears in. Naturally, discussion of why this has happened is also being censored on Chinese social media.
    This comes out after a new set of policies were released by Beijing’s Cyberspace Administration agency. With the goal of rectifying issues with fan communities to ensure the “political and ideological safety in the cyberspace as well as creating a clean internet”. As we’ve seen the disruptive nature of social media platforms has on political process is evident. So it’s no wonder that the Chinese government has continued its attempts to suppress dissent and as it appears, “personality cults” surrounding whomever it deems to be “unsavory individuals”.

    Like

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