Cultural Reflection

My last blog post explored memories of my youth and my encounters with Asian food. The recount of my past experiences is subject to my personal, cultural framework which have ultimately shaped my engagements and emotions towards them.

Cultural framework is embedded within and often subconsciously used throughout day to day life. It shapes values and beliefs while explaining tradition within society. Hofstede’s cultural dimensions can explain these differences among groups.

Given my initial neutral experience with the local Chinese restaurant, I was unaware of how much more there was culturally behind the food. Once I experienced the more flamboyant environment of Melbourne China town it became more of a luxury to me as it was at a far distance to where I resided. The quick and inconsistent exposure left me curious and intrigued, feelings that have never left.

With steak and veggies being the staple throughout my life, consuming something so different from the ‘norm’ of not only me but my acquaintances leads to so many questions. Growing up with a farming family I understood how I got my food and why we ate it – because we grew it, that was our farming culture, but I always wondered what their process of creation and consumption was. This was me comparing and contrasting my personal experience against existing research which Ellis (2011) argues is a key to understanding between insiders and outsiders.

Can culture dictate the way we see? Definitely.

Clusters of knowledge from both personal experience and academic research form to facilitate pathways in autoethnography (Hannah & Simeone 2018). This brings me to my current situation of combining my initial encounters and curiosity of Asian and its surroundings. Both will contribute to creating my project and enhancing my views while educating others.

In regards to my YouTube investigation, the platform itself has become a regular part of my life. Growing up with technology it adds to the way I engage in the digital side of my study, something that I am familiar and comfortable with.

Conveying understanding goes through stages and those stages depend on an individual’s cultural framework.
1. Encounter
2. Curiosity
3. Personal relation
4. Research

References:

  • Ellis, Carolyn; Adams, Tony E. & Bochner, Arthur P. (2010). Autoethnography: An Overview [40 paragraphs]. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research12(1), Art. 10, http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101108.
  • Hannah, M.A & Simeone. M 2018, ‘Exploring an Ethnography-based Knowledge Network Model for Professional Communication Analysis of Knowledge Integration’, Transactions on Professional Communication, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 372-388

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