Understanding Akira: A Stranger Thing

briloulaw

Autoethnography, as defined last blog post, is described by Carolyn Ellis as “an approach to research and writing that seeks to describe and systematically analyze (graphy) personal experience (auto) in order to understand cultural experience (ethno).”

It’s a broad, sweeping definition that has a whole lot to unpack. But really, what does this mean?

The methodology has been broken down into steps: 1. Determine your field site. 2. Gather your data. 3. Identify key observations/epiphanies. 4. Interrogate your assumptions. 5. Engage in further research and analysis. 6. Communicate your findings.

Drawing on my viewing experience (which I documented via live-tweeting) of the 1988 Japanese Anime Akira, I will attempt to identify the elements of an autoethnographic process as I tried to make sense of the text as a white Australian female in 2018.

One of my favourite live-tweeting tropes while watching the assigned…

View original post 640 more words

One comment

  1. Hi Brianna, I totally agree with the point you made about having to connect my own pop culture references to the screenings we have had so far because I think, and I tweeted about it in week one, that we use whatever we are comfortable with to describe or define the uncomfortable. That is what makes conducting an autoethnography, like you said, so personal because you are combining your own ideals and viewpoints from your own culture and using them in order to understand a different culture. So that’s why I’m always curious of international students, as they would be conducting their own personal autoethnographies without even knowing.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s